Posts by clairemilroy

Affordable On-site Water Treatment with new SewTreat Build-Own-Operate Model

August 22nd, 2018 Posted by Press Releases 0 thoughts on “Affordable On-site Water Treatment with new SewTreat Build-Own-Operate Model”

Local waste water treatment firm, SewTreat, announces the launch of the SewTreat Build-Own-Operate model. This model makes the installation and operation of an on-site waste water treatment solution more affordable for businesses of any size.

#WaterCrisis: SewTreat Produces Unbelievable Water Savings for Cape Town’s One&Only Resort

June 18th, 2018 Posted by Uncategorized 0 thoughts on “#WaterCrisis: SewTreat Produces Unbelievable Water Savings for Cape Town’s One&Only Resort”

Cape Town, 18 June 2018: SewTreat has completed the installation of a waste water treatment plant at the One&Only Cape Town that will result in a 40kl saving in municipal water per day. This translates to a phenomenal R114 000 per month reduction in water costs for the well-known V&A Waterfront hotel.

 

Along with numerous water-saving measures already implemented at the One&Only Resort in Cape Town, the installation of Above Ground HDPE Waste Water Treatment Plants has been completed by SewTreat. The initial Phase 1 plant will remove 40kl of sewage per day from the hotel’s plumbing system and purify it to product water standards. The purified water will then be used in the hotel’s cooling towers. This will save the hotel 40kl per day in potable municipal-treated water previously utilised to run the cooling towers.

 

Although Day Zero has once again been moved forward after the recent rainfall in the area, the long term financial implications of the drought for the tourism industry in Cape Town are undeniable. “Even if dam levels rise following the winter rainfall, the long term impact of the drought is that a high cost for water will remain in place for at least the next five years. This has potentially devastating consequences for hospitality businesses in the Cape,” states SewTreat spokesperson, Theunis Coetzer. “Looking at the current costs of municipal water and sewage treatment in Cape Town versus the savings that SewTreat’s plant will achieve for the One&Only, it is clear that recycling waste water is an affordable and viable way for hotels in this region to save both water and money.”

 

“The current cost of potable water from the Cape Town Metro is R57 per 1000 litres and the cost of sewage disposal is R38 per litres. In One&Only’s case, because the first plant recycles 40kl of sewage waste per day, the hotel no longer has a need to pay for 40kl of water or for the sewage discharge. This can be calculated as a total saving of R3800 per day or R114 000 per month. Annually they save R1, 368 million from Phase 1 alone,” Coetzer explains.

 

Phase 2 involves the installation of a second plant that will be used to treat sewage to potable standards for re-use in swimming pools, general cleaning, washing machines and the flushing of toilets. “Phase two will see an additional 80kl saving for the hotel per day. Taking into account the total saving offered by both plants, this translates to an incredible annual saving of R4, 104 million. This means that the One&Only will see a full return on investment for the project in just eight months,” Coetzer explains.

 

After both phases are complete and operational, One&Only Cape Town will have cut potable water usage from 220kl per day, to just 40kl per day being drawn from municipal lines.  This is just 15% of the original quantity of water that they previously had to draw from Cape Town Metro. According to Coetzer, this remaining 15% will cover the hotel’s water needs for potable water to be used for drinking water, food preparation and showers. All other water requirements such as cooling tower water, pool filling, irrigation, car washes, general cleaning and laundry will be met through recycling.

 

In addition to the water and cost saving advantages, the One&Only also benefited from the quick and easy installation of this type of plant. SewTreat’s HDPE Above Ground treatment plants are easy to install due to the minimal civil works required while maintenance and operation of the system are effortless due to its being an above ground system. The timeframe for complete installation of both phases from SewTreat’s initial consultation with the hotel’s management to being installed and completely operational was just 8 weeks.

 

“The One&Only had previously considered desalination, but it proved to be three times more expensive than the SewTreat plant in terms of total installation costs, on-going maintenance and operation and power usage. In addition to this it would have taken four times longer to install – by which time Day Zero could have been just around the corner,” says Coetzer.

 

Coetzer says that the additional benefits for the One&Only include power usage and monthly operational costs of the plants. “The total power consumption of SewTreat’s plants is a mere 6kw, which is comparable to the power consumption of three swimming pool pumps. Then, the monthly consumable cost of the SewTreat system is just R2 500 per month.”

 

As part of the installation, SewTreat included an air scrubbing system to ensure that there are absolutely no odour emissions from the plant – a must for a prestigious hotel such as the One&Only according to Coetzer. He goes on to say that they are thrilled to be partnering with the hotel in the future. “SewTreat will also be involved in the design and implementation of ‘Liveview’ platforms that the hotel wants to install so that the water savings can be tracked in real time. To further prove our commitment to helping them realise their water saving goals we have offered the One&Only a 100% money back guarantee should the plant not perform as per design efficiency.”

Recycling Waste Water the Key to Water Security

February 22nd, 2018 Posted by Press Releases 0 thoughts on “Recycling Waste Water the Key to Water Security”

Witbank, 22 February 2018: Could it be that recycling the water we have is the key to water availability relief for the Cape region – as opposed to imposing increasingly stricter and potential unviable water usage restrictions as well as costly desalination? SewTreat have put forward another option – the biological treatment and recycling of waste water.

 

The Cape’s worst drought in a century has the region’s reservoirs and dams at record lows. The communities in the region are now at severe risk of running out of water altogether while the all-important agricultural sector has been plunged into crisis, affecting the local economy. With the latest ‘Day Zero’ restrictions set to be put into place allowing residents a mere 25 litres per day for personal use, the situation is now more dire than anyone could have predicted.

 

SewTreat spokesperson, Theunis Coetzer, says that these restrictions ultimately still result in water wastage. “We need to ask ourselves if whether we are restricting use to 25 litres per person per day destined to go down the drain and be gone forever. Not if we could recycle this back into clean, safe drinking water,” says Coetzer. “In the past the costs of the infrastructure required and the fact that we had cost effective water supply, prevented the technology to take root,  but modular plant designs using biological treatment methods are changing the game.”

 

Treating sewage water and waste water for re-use is by no means a new concept but previously the methods used and the infrastructure construction needed to implement water recycling have made it a wonderful ‘green’ dream that no one could financially realise. We have also had relatively cost effective water being supplied to us. In addition to this, Coetzer explains that there has been a stigma around drinking or re-using treated and recycled sewage water. “What businesses, schools and hospitals will start to realise is that recycling water by means of natural, eco-friendly, biological treatment methods is the best and most cost effective way to ensure water availability and security – and that it is now becoming a matter of life and death.”

 

While the concept was unthinkable in a South African setting two years ago, it has been successfully done in numerous countries around the world for years. In 2014, three years into California’s worst drought in over a century, the state’s Orange County Water District (OCWD), established a pioneering waste water treatment facility that recycles used water – or sewage – and returns it to the drinking supply. The plant’s production expanded from 259 to 370 million litres per day which is enough for 850,000 people.

 

Closer to home, Windhoek has been successfully treating waste water to drinking standards for the past 50 years. Most of the waste water produced by Windhoek’s 300 000 residents is sent to the Goreangab waste treatment plant – the first stop in the city’s pioneering water recycling system. The systems and technology have more than proven themselves – and far from being repulsed by the idea of drinking recycled sewage water, the residents have no complaints and are in fact proud of what they have achieved with the plant. Many call it Africa’s origin story for water reclamation and potable reclamation, and the plant gets thousands of visitors from around the world who are keen to see where this all started way back in 1968.

 

Businesses, organisations, residential estates, schools, retirement homes, retail spaces, farms and communities will likely be pursuing the installation of modular, biological waste water treatment plants in the year ahead because these systems can be implemented very quickly and at an affordable price. In fact the price comparison between re-cycling used and sewage water and desalination is staggering. The cost factor is based around the highly concentrated waste (brine) and high electrical energy requirements for desalination that make it more expensive in terms of Rand per litre for the final drinkable water.

 

SewTreat offers specialized, modular biological waste water treatment plant designs tailor-made for the South African and African market. Their approach is based on return activated sludge technology incorporating submersed aeration media. This enhanced bacterial action ensures a highly effective treatment process boasting a very low carbon footprint, minimal capital input and low maintenance requirements.

 

Their product offering includes modular Fibre Glass waste water treatment plants that can be installed either above or below ground for any operation from home use to medium sized business operations. Tailor-made for homeowners and lodges, they also offer DIY plants that are cost effective and easy to install. For larger business operations and firms within the industrial sectors, Sewtreat also offers Mega and Civil Constructed waste water treatment plants.

 

“It is 100% possible to recycle both sewage and waste water to the point that it is safe for drinking. We are facing a major water crisis of epic proportions and it is time to recognise this process for the major contribution that it can make to water security,” Cotzer concludes.

#BizTrends2018: Recycling of wastewater is the key to water security

January 12th, 2018 Posted by SewTreat in the News 0 thoughts on “#BizTrends2018: Recycling of wastewater is the key to water security”

Could it be that recycling the water we have is the key to water availability relief for the Cape region – as opposed to imposing increasingly stricter and potentially unviable water usage restrictions as well as costly desalination? Previously, the costs of the infrastructure required have proven prohibitive – but modular plant designs using biological, environmentally friendly treatment methods are changing the game.

Famed SA Attraction Benefits from SewTreat’s Sustainable Sanitation Technology

November 2nd, 2017 Posted by Press Releases 0 thoughts on “Famed SA Attraction Benefits from SewTreat’s Sustainable Sanitation Technology”

Witbank, 17 October 2017: The environmental footprint of world renowned tourist attraction, the Bourke’s Luck Potholes in Mpumalanga, has been taken to new level thanks to SewTreat’s supply of a biological waste water treatment plant for the Mpumalanga Tourism & Parks Agency.

 

The existing septic tank system servicing the main reception and bathroom facilities at Bourke’s Luck Potholes has been replaced with sustainable sanitation technology thanks to SewTreat. “This technology will ensure that from now on, only clean, recycled effluent is discharged into the Blyde River thereby helping to conserve and preserve the precious ecosystem if the Blyde River system,” enthused Theunis Coetzer, spokesperson for SewTreat.

 

The Bourke’s Luck Potholes welcomes in excess of 1 million visitors annually – the majority of which are foreign tourists. According to Coetzer, the existing infrastructure was out-dated could not cope with the high volumes of effluent produced.  “The old septic system was discharging substandard effluent into the Blyde River causing secondary contamination and pollution of this pristine river system,” said Coetzer.

 

Through the appointed consulting engineers for the project, SewTreat was contracted by the Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency to design, construct and install a complete waste water treatment plant for all effluent generated by the current sanitation facilities at the Bourke’s Luck Potholes site. The decision to appoint SewTreat was based on the ability of their products to treat waste water and sewage using environmentally friendly methods.

 

“Our motto is to treat nature with nature,” Coetzer explained. “All our plants make use of our proprietary strain of natural bacteria developed by our in-house team. The bacteria ensure that all waste is treated by a biological process resulting in a clean final effluent that is kinder to the environment.”

 

Biological wastewater treatment is an accepted practice used worldwide. The process involves confining naturally occurring bacteria at a very high concentration in the treatment process, whether it in plastic type, containerised type or civil constructed type treatment plants. From here this bacteria, together with some protozoa and other microbes (collectively referred to as activated sludge), are treated in an anaerobic and an aerobic process. They are then returned to the anaerobic phase to eliminate sludge accumulation and waste generation. Coetzer elaborated by saying: “In a nutshell, the bacteria digest all impurities and the wastewater is then cleansed. The treated wastewater or effluent can then be safely discharged to receiving waters – normally a river or the sea – or alternatively used for irrigation, flushing of toilets or general non-potable uses.”

 

After conducting a full assessment, SewTreat opted to supply a plastic, above ground type waste water treatment plant which would cope with the amount of waste to be processed daily, could be installed easily given the challenging access to the site and would be completed under a tight deadline and budget. SewTreat’s technology will now ensure that the Bourke’s Luck Potholes and the Blyde river system are kept pristine and unpolluted at a staggering rate of 7.5 million litres per year.

 

Coetzer concluded by saying: “We hope that by offering wastewater management products that are cost effective, easy to install, simple to maintain and provide a green waste solution; we can help all of our precious local tourism and conservation sites move towards a greener future. Preventing further damage to the environment requires a fundamental shift in how tourism operations conduct their business and manage resources. Changing how you treat your wastewater to a method that results in reusable effluent is a major step towards sustainability where the long term beneficiaries will be South Africa’s nature, wildlife and resources.”

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The Easiest Way to Save Water Around the Home this Year

January 20th, 2017 Posted by Press Releases 0 thoughts on “The Easiest Way to Save Water Around the Home this Year”

Although choosing to go green in any part of your daily life is a noble effort, it might not always be feasible or simple to fit into your lifestyle. Theunis Coetzer, spokesman for local waste water treatment firm, SewTreat, provides a solution that will help you make water conservation an easy resolution to stick to this year.

“Few people likely make New Year’s resolutions about conserving water and this can be attributed to the fact that it is simply too difficult to achieve for a number of reasons,” Coetzer says.  “But, reducing water consumption is something we all must take very seriously now. Although the country has received some very welcome rainfall recently, we are not in the clear yet with regards to water shortages.”

Understandably, if you have a growing family it is difficult to cut back on the endless loads of laundry that need to be done or use of that of life saving dishwasher. Some might not want to give up those blissfully long showers after a tough day or might be concerned about the garden they have been nurturing for years and simply can’t bear to water less. With so many practical lifestyle factors to consider, how do you overcome the challenge of introducing water saving measures to your home? SewTreat has the answer – manage your home’s waste sustainably and create treated water that can be re-used.

SewTreat offers easy-to-install waste water treatment plants that offer homeowners a sensible and practical green feature to add to their home that will recycle 100% of previously discarded water. In addition to this, you could save up to 50% on your monthly water bill!

“Clean drinking water is purchased from a municipality. Around 80% of this water ends up being discharged into the municipal sewers which you are also being charged for by the municipality. So, in essence, homeowners pay twice for the same water,” Coetzer explains. “By installing a wastewater treatment system for your home, the discard cost is eliminated and all the water that is treated can be reused for irrigation, washing your car and other non-potable uses around the house.”

SewTreat offers two types of DIY waste water treatment plants that have been designed to be ideal for home use – above ground installation or below ground installation. The above ground system is the most cost effective and can be installed with minimal excavation and construction. The below ground installation is more aesthetically pleasing but requires excavation and civil works which makes it more expensive. The modular construction of the plants means that expanding them in the future is easy and all the mechanical equipment that you need to manage your plant is installed for easy access.

SewTreat’s DIY plants can also be installed as a cost effective alternative to septic tanks and soakaways. These plants are designed for small applications and are so easy to install that clients could it do it themselves which creates even more cost saving, although SewTreat can come out and do the installation for you.

SewTreat’s waste water treatment plants treat water biologically using an enhanced strain of bacteria that has been developed in-house by SewTreat’s expert team. The enhanced bacterial action in their plants ensures a highly effective treatment process that boasts a very low carbon footprint, minimal capital input and low maintenance requirements.

“In a nutshell, the bacteria digest all impurities and the wastewater is then cleansed. The treated wastewater can then be discharged or re-used for general non-potable uses,” says Coetzer. “SewTreat has developed a highly effective multiple strain bacteria range that gets added to our plants. This specifically bred bacteria feed on the complex substances in the wastewater, converting them into simpler substances which improves the final effluent on a reduced footprint.”

“There are of course several additional measures that people can take in their homes to save water if these measures are feasible but being able to re-use treated water to wash your car or water your garden means using water twice instead of watching it go down the drain,” says Coetzer.  “This can result in the biggest water savings of all.”

Lodge Operators: The Easiest Way for You to Save Water this Year

January 18th, 2017 Posted by Press Releases 0 thoughts on “Lodge Operators: The Easiest Way for You to Save Water this Year”

One of the main goals of any lodge, especially those located nearby or within nature conservation areas is saving water. However, this is not always easy and might require looking at water saving from a different angle. Theunis Coetzer, spokesman for local waste water treatment firm, SewTreat, provides a solution that will help you make water conservation an easy resolution to stick to this year.

“For lodge operators, saving water can simply be too difficult to implement for a number of reasons,” Coetzer says.  “But, reducing water consumption is something we all must take very seriously now. Although the country has received some very welcome rainfall recently, we are not in the clear yet with regards to water shortages.”

Unfortunately, although you can request this of your guests, you cannot control how much water they use when staying at your lodge. Additional water is also required to keep vehicles clean, swimming pools full and sparkling and gardens around the lodge lush and inviting. These and various additional factors related to the practical day to day requirement of your operation can make saving water seem like an impossible goal. SewTreat has the answer – manage your lodge’s waste sustainably and create treated water that can be re-used.

SewTreat has developed wastewater solutions that use natural biotechnology to create a sustainable green solution that can be tailored to any lodge’s needs.

Their Plastic HDPE Tank wastewater treatment plant range makes use of plastic ‘Jo-Jo’ type tanks that are connected in series or parallel depending on site requirements. The plant is wholly constructed and cold commissioned before delivery to client premises for quick and easy installation (a 50kl per day plant can be assembled on site in less than five days).

SewTreat’s DIY plants are designed for small applications such as households and lodges. They are so easy to install that clients could it do it themselves which creates even more cost saving, although SewTreat can carry out the installation. SewTreat offers two types of DIY plants – above ground installation or below ground installation. The above ground system is the most cost effective and can be installed with minimal excavation and construction required. The below ground installation is more aesthetically pleasing as it can covered with vegetation. The modular construction of the plants means that expanding them in the future is easy and they are gravity fed (depending on the level of the incoming pipe).

SewTreat’s waste water treatment plants treat water biologically using an enhanced strain of bacteria that has been developed in-house by SewTreat’s expert team. The enhanced bacterial action in their plants ensures a highly effective treatment process that boasts a very low carbon footprint, minimal capital input and low maintenance requirements.

Biological wastewater treatment is an accepted practice used worldwide. The process involves confining naturally occurring bacteria at a very high concentration in the treatment process. From here this bacteria, together with some protozoa and other microbes (collectively referred to as activated sludge), are treated in an anaerobic and an aerobic process. They are then returned to the anaerobic phase to eliminate sludge accumulation and waste generation. “In a nutshell, the bacteria digest all impurities and the wastewater is then cleansed. The treated wastewater can then be discharged or re-used for general non-potable uses,” says Coetzer. “SewTreat has developed a highly effective multiple strain bacteria range that gets added to our plants. This specifically bred bacteria feed on the complex substances in the wastewater, converting them into simpler substances which improves the final effluent on a reduced footprint.”

Besides the environmental benefits, SewTreat’s product offering has been tailored to the operational needs of lodges operating in Africa. “We have developed our products and services to embrace our customers’ operating environments and the on-going demand for environmental, social and financial sustainable solutions,” Coetzer explains.

“For some lodges, being able to re-use previously discarded water will be a complete game changer in terms of water savings, knowing every time they use the non-potable water that they are doing their part will hopefully make water recycling a viable goal to reach in 2017,” Coetzer concludes.

#BizTrends 2017: Water recycling, re-use and sustainability

January 12th, 2017 Posted by SewTreat in the News 0 thoughts on “#BizTrends 2017: Water recycling, re-use and sustainability”

Stats SA indicated in 2013 that 90.8% of South African households have piped water to their dwellings. On 18 November 2015, Zandile Mathe of the Department of Water and Sanitation indicated that 30% (248) municipal waste water treatment plants are in critical state. This indicates that although SA has made huge leaps in provision of clean water, there is still a significant amount of untreated sewage contaminating our water courses.

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SewTreat Featured in Go!Platteland Magazine

December 15th, 2016 Posted by SewTreat in the News 0 thoughts on “SewTreat Featured in Go!Platteland Magazine”

SewTreat Featured in the Summer 2017 edition of Go!Platteland Magazine.

 

From grey to green

SewTreat is an ecofriendly solution for homeowners who’d like to treat every drop of grey water for use in the garden with peace of mind. This system, which could cut your water bill by up to 50%, can be installed above or below ground – the underground system looks better, but the excavations and engineering would cost more.

sabi-feature

SewTreat Featured in SABI Magazine

December 12th, 2016 Posted by SewTreat in the News 0 thoughts on “SewTreat Featured in SABI Magazine”

SewTreat Featured in the December 2016 edition of SABI Magazine

A leading manufacturer of PVC and HDPE water reticulation and drainage pipe and fitting systems, DPI Plastics is a key supporter of AMWN’s activities related to reducing marine waste and debris threatening South Africa’s coastlines and marine life.

The AMWN was launched in July 2016 by the Sustainable Seas Trust (SST), Plastics SA and other partners in Port Elizabeth, Eastern Cape. The network is the first dedicated approach to address marine waste at a pan-African level.